Mississippi governor 'hopeful' constituents will overcome hesitancy on vaccines

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Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said Sunday he’s hopeful his constituents will receive the Covid-19 vaccine despite the state’s low vaccination rate.

"I’m hopeful as we move forward, that more and more of my constituents will recognize the importance of it," Reeves said on CNN’s "State of the Union."

Reeves added that vaccine hesitancy in rural communities is affecting the state’s vaccination rate.

“I don’t think there’s any doubt there’s vaccine hesitancy, particularly in rural areas across America," Reeves said. "We also had vaccine hesitancy early on within our African American community, in our state and across America."

Despite the state having only 16 percent of the population fully vaccinated, Reeves has loosened restrictions in the state. Early last month, Reeves issued an executive order lifting the mask mandate and business capacity requirements. In late March, he added an order that indoor arenas could increase capacity to 75 percent.

When asked if an endorsement from President Donald Trump would help his constituents get vaccinated, he said that education needs to be the main priority.

"Well, I certainly think that President Trump and other leaders across America, not only political leaders, but leaders across all methods would be helpful," Reeves said. "But let’s be honest … We need to educate folks."

Some leaders have suggested fully vaccinated Americans be given vaccine passports that would offer proof of their status and thereby allow them to do things that those who have not gotten the shots can’t do. But Reeves said he was against vaccination passports, saying: "I don’t think it’s necessary or a good thing to do in America."

"At some point, we got to let Americans make the decision that they think is the best for them and their family," he said.

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